I Have Compassion upon You – 3 Nephi 17:6-7

6 And he said unto them: Behold, my bowels are filled with compassion towards you.
7 Have ye any that are sick among you? Bring them hither. Have ye any that are lame, or blind, or halt, or maimed, or leprous, or that are withered, or that are deaf, or that are afflicted in any manner? Bring them hither and I will heal them, for I have compassion upon you; my bowels are filled with mercy.

Jesus showed compassion. He was aware of the people around Him, felt empathy for them, and reached out proactively to serve them. For example, Mark tells a story of a blind beggar pleading with the Savior to have mercy on him. The people nearby rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but the Savior stopped and asked the beggar to come to Him. “And Jesus answered and said unto him, What wilt thou that I should do unto thee? The blind man said unto him, Lord, that I might receive my sight. And Jesus said unto him, Go thy way; thy faith hath made thee whole. And immediately he received his sight” (Mark 10:46-51).
As shown in the passage above, Jesus demonstrated the same empathy and compassion during His visit to the American continent following His resurrection.
President Thomas S. Monson once shared an anonymous letter the Church received a few years ago describing a remarkable act of compassion:

To the Office of the First Presidency:
Salt Lake City showed me Christian hospitality once during my wandering years.
On a cross-country journey by bus to California, I stepped down in the terminal in Salt Lake City, sick and trembling from aggravated loss of sleep caused by a lack of necessary medication. In my headlong flight from a bad situation in Boston, I had completely forgotten my supply.
In the Temple Square Hotel restaurant, I sat dejectedly. Out of the corner of my eye I saw a couple approach my table. ‘Are you all right, young man?’ the woman asked. I raised up, crying and a bit shaken, related my story and the predicament I was in then. They listened carefully and patiently to my nearly incoherent ramblings, and then they took charge. They spoke with the restaurant manager, then told me I could have all I wanted to eat there for five days. They took me next door to the hotel desk and got me a room for five days. Then they drove me to a clinic and saw that I was provided with the medications I needed—truly my basic lifeline to sanity and comfort.
While I was recuperating and building my strength, I made it a point to attend the daily Tabernacle organ recitals. The celestial voicing of that instrument from the faintest intonation to the mighty full organ is the most sublime sonority of my acquaintance. I have acquired albums and tapes of the Tabernacle organ and the choir which I can rely upon any time to soothe and buttress a sagging spirit.
On my last day at the hotel, before I resumed my journey, I turned in my key; and there was a message for me from that couple: ‘Repay us by showing gentle kindness to some other troubled soul along your road.’ That was my habit, but I determined to be more keenly on the lookout for someone who needed a lift in life.
I wish you well. I don’t know if these are indeed the ‘latter days’ spoken of in the scriptures, but I do know that two members of your church were saints to me in my desperate hours of need. I just thought you might like to know (“Compassion,” General Conference, April 2001).

Today, I will follow the Savior’s example of compassion. I will pay attention to the needs of the people around me. I will make an effort to understand and empathize with their suffering. And I will be quick to serve them and provide the assistance they need.
This entry was posted in 3 Nephi, Charity, Love, Service and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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