Come, Follow Me

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Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints follow a curriculum called “Come, Follow Me” for gospel study in church classes, with their families, and as individuals. In 2021, I’m using this curriculum to structure my study of the Book of Mormon, even though the assigned text this year is the Doctrine and Covenants. Here’s how that works:

  • I follow the schedule given in the manual “Come, Follow Me—For Individuals and Families: Doctrine and Covenants 2021.”
  • Each Sunday, I write an overview post, summarizing the reading, sharing some of my insights into that week’s assignment, and sharing relevant Book of Mormon passages and blog posts.
  • Monday through Saturday, I will write a post each day about themes from that week’s reading.

I hope the insights I share are useful to you this year. Please feel free to comment on my posts or send me questions that come up in your study.

Weekly Overview Posts

Doctrine and Covenants 85-87: “Stand Ye in Holy Places” (August 2-8)

Between November and December 1832, Joseph Smith received specific revelation about multiple topics: CHURCH ADMINISTRATION (Doctrine and Covenants 85): How to manage inheritances for church members who refused to consecrate their properties. The Lord answered the question while clarifying the duties of the clerk, including the responsibility for accurate record-keeping. SCRIPTURAL INTERPRETATION (Doctrine and Covenants… Continue Reading →

Moroni 7-9: “May Christ Lift Thee Up” (December 7-13)

In chapters 7-9 of his book, Moroni recorded three messages from his father: a sermon and two letters. Here is what I have learned from each of these messages: How to receive “every good thing” (Moroni 7) Moroni tells us that his father’s sermon in the synagogue is about “faith, hope, and charity” (Moroni 7:1)…. Continue Reading →

Ether 6-11: “That Evil May Be Done Away” (November 16-22)

For nearly a year, the first generation of Jaredites sat in eight small barges as storms and “mountain waves” moved them across the ocean. After arriving in the promised land, they and their descendants were afflicted by another kind of storm—political instability. Generation after generation of Jaredites lived under oppressive rulers, experienced coups and civil… Continue Reading →

Ether 1-5: “Rend That Veil of Unbelief” (November 9-15)

President Russell M. Nelson said, “I urge you to stretch beyond your current spiritual ability to receive personal revelation, for the Lord has promised that ‘if thou shalt [seek], thou shalt receive revelation upon revelation, knowledge upon knowledge, that thou mayest know the mysteries and peaceable things—that which bringeth joy, that which bringeth life eternal’”… Continue Reading →

3 Nephi 8-11: “Arise and Come Forth unto Me” (September 14-20)

Thunderings, lightnings, storms, tempests, and earthquakes, unlike anything they had ever seen before—that’s what the Nephites and the Lamanites experienced at the time of the Savior’s crucifixion. At least sixteen cities were destroyed by fire, or buried, or covered with water. Many other cities were partially destroyed, and many people died. All of this happened… Continue Reading →

Helaman 7-12: “Remember the Lord” (August 24-30)

After a miraculous mission among the Lamanites and a frustrating mission among the Nephites in the north, Nephi returned to his home in Zarahemla. As the former chief judge, he was horrified by the corruption in their government and the rampant wickedness among the people. In frustration, he said a very public prayer on a… Continue Reading →

Helaman 1-6: “The Rock of Our Redeemer” (August 17-23)

Over a thirty-year period, from about 52 B.C. to about 23 B.C., Nephite society deteriorated substantially. They had just won an extended war against their enemies, the Lamanites, but they were now losing an internal war. The rise of the Gadianton robbers, the decline of faith, and an increase in contention destabilized their government, eroded… Continue Reading →

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